Aramaic Project - Interview and Performances - Quick List

Project Number Index -> 110-101 100-91 90-81 80-71 70-61 60-51 50-41 40-31 30-21 20-11 10-1

Main index .

Aramaic Project Number Description Video
104 Joseph Thekkedath Puthenkudy (Rocky) in conversion with Dr. Joseph J. Palackal Video
103 Rev Dr Cherian Thalakulam, CMI in conversation with Dr. Joseph J. Palackal Video
102 Fr Antony Sylvester Puthussery, CMI in conversion with Dr. Joseph J, Palackal CMI Video
101 First communion celebration begins with the famous Chirstological hymn in Syriac - "Sagdīnan mār" at St, Jude Syro Malabar Catholic Church, Northern Virginia, USA. 26 May 2018 Video
100

A Historic Event - Solemn Qurbana in Syriac -

Dukhrana Perunal, June 30, 2018, - Celebrants Rev. Fr. Varghese (Saji) Mattathil - Main Syriac Celebrant Rev. Fr. George (Joshy) Elambasseril - Vicar, Co-Celebrant Rev. Fr. Dr. Luke Kalarickal - Homily, Co-Celebrant
Video
99 Qandīšā alāhā at St. Alphonsa Syro-Malabar Community, Southend at Sea, England. Video
98 "Sagdinan Mar" in Birmingham, England - Dr. Joseph J. Palackal teaches the choir members, the aramaic chant "Sagdinan Mar" Video
97 Qandisa alaha at Syro Malabar Church, Dallas, Texas, USA Video
96 Solemn Sung Qurbana in Syriac at Irinjalakkuda Video
95 Qurbana begins with Puqdankon at St. Jude Syro Malabar Church, N. Virginia, USA Video
94 Meera Mary Jacob, on the way to school, singing a Syriac Chant. Video
93 Fr. Issac Chackalaparampil, CMI Video
92 Fr. Cyril Thayyil Chants the Institution narrative in Syriac Video
91 Bishop Joseph Kallarangatt sings "Sagdīnan mār" Video
90 Young Syro Malabar Catholics getting comfortable with bilingual Qurbana Video
89 Chavara archives at Mannanam. A treasure house for researchers Video
88 Fr. THOMAS KANJIRATHUMOOTTIL, Athirampuzha in conversaton with Dr. Joseph J. Palackal CMI Video
87 Bar Mariyam during priestly ordination of Fr. Kevin Mundackal held at St. Thomas Syro Malabar Catholic Church at Somerset, New Jersey, on 5 May 2018 Video
86 "Qandisa alaha," during the rite of priestly ordination of Rev. Kevin Mundackal held at St. Thomas Syro Malabar Catholic Church at Somerset, New Jersey, on 5 May 2018 Video
85 Etha Pus Lek. From Funeral services for priests. lead voice: Fr. Cyril Thayyil Video
84 "Witawangunnen." Funeral services for priests. Sung by Fr. S. Sankoorikkal Video
83

Varghese Chiriyankandath, Sacristan and church musician. St. Joseph's Church, Pavaratty. Archdiocese of Thrisssur, Kerala.

Video
82 Trilingual Syro Malabar Qurbana in Germany (German, Syriac, English) Video
82a Qandiśā alāhā during trilingual mass in Germany. Holy Cross Church Video
82b Laku mara. Resurrection hymn in Syriac, during trilingual (German, English and Syriac) qurbana. Video
82c Dr.Joseph Palackal’s homily during trilingual mass In Germany Video
81 "Etha Pus lek" from funeral services for priests in the Syro Malabar Church Video
81a "Witawangunnen." Funeral services for priests in the Syro Malabar Church Video
80 Solemn sung Qurbana (Syriac). Msgr. Jacob Vellian Video
80a Puqdankon in Syriac Qurbana
See the full Qurbana:
Video
80c "Thesbohtha l'alāhā" (Glory to God) Excerpt from Solemn Qurbana in Syriac
See the full Qurbana:
Video
80d Our Father with thrice holy. Awun d'wasmayya
See the full Qurbana:
Video
80e Slotha-oration after the Lord's Prayer
See the full Qurbana:
Video
80f Slotha-oration after the Lord's Prayer
See the full Qurbana:
Video
80g

Slotha-oration after the psalms

See the full Interview

Video
80h Lakumara - Resurrectioh hymn in Syriac
See the full Qurbana:
Video
80j Qandisa Alaha- trisagion in Syriac
See the full Qurbana:
Video
80k Reading of Epistle in Syriac qurbana
See the full Qurbana:
Video
80l Alleluia in Syriac Qurbana
See the full Qurbana:
Video
80m Chanting of the Gospel in Syriac Qurbana
See the full Qurbana:
Video
80n

Slotha -oration after the gospel proclamtion

See the full Qurbana:

Video
80o Karosutha -Prayers of the faithful in Syriac qurbana
See the full Qurbana:
Video
80p Anthem Of The Misteries -pagare damsiha
See the full Qurbana:
Video
80q Commemoration Hymn- Suwha alaha in Syriac Qurbana
See the full Qurbana:
Video
79 Sagdinan Mar: A unique Syriac chant (Christological) Video
78 Binu & Deepa singing syriac chants with a smile Video
78a

Melody of ""Ennan lahma" I am the living bread -Binu & Deepa singing syriac chants with a smile

Video
78b The Creed-Binu & Deepa singing syriac chants Video
78c Maran iso-Binu & Deepa singing syriac chants Video
78d Trisagion (Qandisa alaha)-Binu & Deepa singing syriac chants Video
78e Laku Mara - Binu & Deepa singing syriac chants Video
78f B'eda Dyawman-Binu & Deepa singing syriac chants Video
78g Holy Holy Holy-Binu & Deepa singing syriac chants Video
77 Syriac Christian Wedding in India - Documentry produced in 1985 Video
76 Dr. Joseph J. Palackal, CMI on Pravasi Channel, USA Manohar Thomas in conversation with Dr. Joseph J. Palackal, CMI Video
76a

"India is not a country, but a concept of coexistence." - Dr. Joseph J. Palackal, CMI

Extract From Dr. Joseph J. Palackal's interview on Pravasi Channel ,USA

Video
76b

"If OM is Hindu, electricity is Christian." - Dr. Joseph J. Palackal, CMI

Extract From Dr. Joseph J. Palackal's interview on Pravasi Channel, USA

Video
75 Fr. Bijo Kochadampallil speaks on three-day lent of the St. Thomas Christians with Dr. Joseph J. Palackal, CMI Video
74 Dr. George Kaniyarakath CMI (Scripture Scholar) in conversation with Dr. Joseph J. Palackal, CMI Video
73 Trilingual (English, Syriac, Malayalam) mass at the Syro Malabar Cathedral Church in Chicago on St. Thomas Day 2017. Celebrant: Rev. Dr. Joseph J. Palackal, CMI. The entire congregation warms up to the melody of Qandisa Alaha. Video
72 Q & A session with Dr. Joseph J. Palackal C.M.I., on Christian Musicology during the Seminar at St. John Damasceno College, Via Boccea, Rome , on 18 March 2017. Video
71 Rev. Fr. Saji Mattathil in conversation with Dr. Joseph J. Palackal at St. John Damasceno College, Via Boccea, Rome Video
71a Fr. Varghese (Saji) Mattathil sings "Walalam Almeen." A unique chant from Raza Video
71b Fr. Saji (Varghese Mattathil) sings the Syriac alphabet Video
70 Fr. George Plathottam. Solemn sung Qurbana in Syriac Video
70A Peace greeting from Syriac Qurbana. Fr. George Plathottam Peace greeting in Syriac from solemn Qurbana of the Syro Malabar Church. Celebrant: Fr. George Plathottam (1933-2016). Old Cathedral Church. Video
70B Puqdānkōn. Solemn Qurbana by Fr. George Plathottam
;See full Qurbana here
Video
70C Thešbōhthā. Solemn Qurbana. Fr. George Plathottam
See full Qurbana here
Video
70D The Lord's prayer with Thrice Holy
See full Qurbana here
Video
70E Hayyel Māran. Slotha-Prayer after the Our Father

See full Qurbana here

Video
70F Psalm. Syriac Qurbana. Fr. George Plathottam

See full Qurbana here

Video
70G

Ualappai. Slotha -prayer after psalm. Fr. Plathottam

See full Qurbana here

Video
70H

Lākāu Mārā. Resurrection hymn from Syro Malabar Qurbana in Syriac

;See full Qurbana here

Video
70I

Athu mar. Slotha/ prayer after the Resurrection hymn

;See full Qurbana here

Video
70J Qandiša Alaha. Qurbana of the Syro Malabar Church
Trisagion followed by slotha-prayer. Celebrant: Fr. George Plathottam. ;See full Qurbana here
Video
70K Siotha - Prayer before the readings, "Anahar lan"

From the Solemn Qurbana of the Syro Malabar Church. Celebrant: Fr. George Plathottam.

See full Qurbana here

Video
70I

Deacon’s Request for Blessing, before reading the epistle here

From the Solemn Qurbana of the Syro Malabar Church. Celebrant: Fr. George Plathottam.

See full Qurbana here

Video
70M Reading of The Epistle

From the Solemn Qurbana of the Syro Malabar Church. Celebrant: Fr. George Plathottam. See full Qurbana here ;

See full Qurbana here

Video
70N Alleluia from Solemn Qurbana in Syriac

From the Solemn Qurbana of the Syro Malabar Church. Celebrant: Fr. George Plathottam. See full Qurbana here ;

See full Qurbana here

Video
70 O Deacon’s Invitation to listen to the Gospel

From the Solemn Qurbana of the Syro Malabar Church. Celebrant: Fr. George Plathottam. See full Qurbana here ;

See full Qurbana here

Video
70P

Peace greeting from Syriac Qurbana. Fr. George Plathottam

From the Solemn Qurbana of the Syro Malabar Church. Celebrant: Fr. George Plathottam. See full Qurbana here ;

See full Qurbana here

Video
70Q Kārōsūsā Prayers Of The Faithful

From the Solemn Qurbana of the Syro Malabar Church. Celebrant: Fr. George Plathottam. See full Qurbana here ;

See full Qurbana here

Video
70R Slotha - prayer "Lāk Māryā"

From the Solemn Qurbana of the Syro Malabar Church. Celebrant: Fr. George Plathottam. See full Qurbana here ;

See full Qurbana here

Video
70S Deacon’a Invitation to bow heads to receive the blessing

From the Solemn Qurbana of the Syro Malabar Church. Celebrant: Fr. George Plathottam. See full Qurbana here ;

See full Qurbana here

Video
70t Slotha - prayer "W'hawlan Mār"

From the Solemn Qurbana of the Syro Malabar Church. Celebrant: Fr. George Plathottam. See full Qurbana here ;

See full Qurbana here

Video
70U Anthem of the Mysteries "Pagare Damšīhā"

From the Solemn Qurbana of the Syro Malabar Church. Celebrant: Fr. George Plathottam. See full Qurbana here ;

See full Qurbana here

Video
70V Commemoration hymn, "Sūwhālawā" from Syriac Qurbana

From the Solemn Qurbana of the Syro Malabar Church. Celebrant: Fr. George Plathottam. See full Qurbana here ;

See full Qurbana here

Video
70W The Creed, " Mhaimnīnan." From the solemn qurbana of the Syro Malabar Church Video
70X Slotha - prayer, " W'naseq Lāk" Video
70AA Introduction To Holy, holy, holy Video
70AB Holy, holy, holy Video
70AC Institiution Narrative in Syriac Video
70AD Slotha - prayer "Ual Appai Kolhon" Video
70AE Bārek mār Fr George Plathottam Video
70AF Ennānā Lahmā I Am The Living Bread Fr George Plathottam Video
70AG Thaibuse Video
70AH Rahme Šūqānaā Rite Of Reconcilitation Video
70AI "Wšwā Lan" Slōthā Before The Lord’s Prayer. Fr. Plathottam Video
70AJ "Āwūn D’wašmayyā" The Lord’s Prayer Video
70AK Ēn Māryā Alāhā" Slōthā After The Our Father Video
70AL The Holy Is For The Holy Ones. Video
70AM Māwhawsā" Prayer after Communion Video
70AN Āhay Qambel" Invitation To Receive Communion Video
70AO Māran Īšō" hymn after Communion Video
70AP Šūwhā Lēh" Chant of Praise by the Deacon Video
70AQ Yāyē Mār" Concluding Prayers. Video
70AR Awūn D’wašmayyā" Our Father Video
70AS Ladhassī" from Final Blessing Video
69 Rev. Dr. George Kurukkoor in conversation with Dr. Joseph J. Palackal. Video
69b Dr. George Kurukkoor speaks on Palackal Thoma Malpan Video
69a Dr. George Kurukkoor speaks on the unique tradition of the Passover ceremony in Kerala Video
68 Dr. Antony Narikulam in conversation with Dr. Joseph J. Palackal Video
67 Dr. Joseph J. Palackal sings 3 Syriac chants at Society for Ethnomusicology 2016 Video
67a Prescreening lecture by Dr. Joseph J. Palackal on the Aramaic Project at SEM 2016 Vidoe
66 Dr. Joseph J. Palackal leads Qandisa Alaha, Trisagion in Syriac at the Basilica of National Shrine, Washington, D. C. Video
66a Qandisa Alaha. Practice session in New Jersey for Qurbana at the Basilica of National Shrine, Washington, D. C. Video
65 Major Archbishop George Cardinal Alencherry sings Puqdankon at the Basilica of National Shrine, Washington, D. C. Video
65a Puqdankon. Music practice in New Jersey for Qurbana at the Basilica of National Shrine, Washington, D. C. Video
64 Qandīšā Ālāha Trisagion in Syric during Qurbana in Malayalam. Tolworth, London Video
64a Lāku Mārā. Resurrection hymn in Syriac during Qurbana in Malayalam. London Video
63 Dr. Joseph J. Palackal's interview on Goodness TV. Dec. 4 & 5, 2016 Video
62 Fr. Mathew Mattam in conversation with Dr. Joseph J. Palackal

This interview with a seasoned singer of the Syriac chants is an extremely valuable addition to the Aramaic Project.Fr. Mattam is blessed with a steady and resonant voice and, even at the age of 84, has the stamina and the breath control of a well-trained opera singer. He is passionate about singing the Syriac melodies that he started learning from his childhood at his native parish. Later, during his seminary years in the 1950s, at St. Joseph’s Seminary at Mangalappuzha, Aluva, he was fortunate to learn more chants from Fr. Mathew Vadakel, an eminent scholar of the Syriac language and composer of Syriac chants. Fr. Mattam sang about 32 melodies during this interview, including several examples of chanting slōthā (oration) between the sung portions of the Mass. He was willing to keep singing, but myself and the recording crew were exhausted after four hours of recording. Some of his renderings will help scholars to study individual variations of the same melody. A case in point is the melody of the Malayalam version of the chant “Pūš bašlāmā” (see topic no. 33 at 1:33:36). He sings this melody in a slow tempo to evoke the mood of pathos that goes along with the context of this chant at the end of a funeral service at home when the dead body is carried in procession to the cemetery. See also extended discussion on “O Des tamman” (topic no.17 at 39:36). It is a pity that such a resourceful person as Fr. Mattam is not sought after by the seminarians and music students in the Syro Malabar Church. We hope to do a follow up interview to eke out all the melodies that are stored in his brain, especially those melodies that were used in the paraliturgical services. Overall, this interview was a rewarding experience.

  • 62a - Fr. Mathew Mattam. Melody of Puqdānkōn Video
  • 62b- Fr. Mathew Mattam. Melody of Tešbōhtā lalāha (Glory to God) Video
  • 62c- Fr. Mathew Mattam sings the solemn form of the Lord's prayer with Thrice Holy Video
  • 62d- Fr. Mathew Mattam. Chanting of slōthā (oration) after the Lord’s prayer Video
  • 62e- Fr. Mathew Mattam. Melody Of Psalm Video
  • 62f -Fr. Mathew Mattam. chanting of Slōthā (oration),after The Psalm Video
  • 62g . Fr. Mathew Mattam. Melody of Lāku Mārā Resurrection Hymn; Video
  • 62h- Fr. Mathew Mattam. Chanting of Slōthā (oration), after Lāku Mārā Video
  • 62i -Fr. Mathew Mattam sings the Trisagion, Qandišā Alāhā Video
  • 62j -Slōthā (oration) after Qandišā Alāhā Video
  • 62k-Melody Of “wehu Nehde” While Kissing The Cross, During Raza Video
  • 62l -Melody of “barek Mār” Video
  • 62m- Style Of Chanting The Sacred Scripture Video
  • 62n- Melody of “O des damman” Video
  • 62o -Melody Of “dawrek Sāwē” During Gospel Procession Video
  • 62p- Melody of “O Damhaimneen” Video
  • 62q -Melody of Announcing the Epistle Video
  • 62r -Melody of the Introductory Chant Before The Gospel Video
  • 62s -Style Of Chanting The Prayers Of The Faithful kārōthūthā
  • 62t- Melody of “wnesek Lāk” before Anaphora Video
  • 62u - Melody of Exchange of Peace Video
  • 62v- Melody of Greeting And Dialogue. Anaphora Video
  • 62w- Melody of “kad Qāyēn” Followed By Holy Holy Holy; Video
  • 62x- Melody of Ēn Māryā Alāhā before Communion Video
  • 62y- Melody of “Māwhawsā” Video
  • 62z- Melody of “āhay Qambel” deacon’s Invitation To Communion Video
  • 62aa- Melody of “raze Dnaswan” after Communion Video
  • 62bb- Melody of Concluding Prayers Before the Final Blessing Video
  • 62cc- Melody of Final Blessing in Solemn Qurbana Video
  • 62dd- Melody of Wita Wangunnen (funeral service for priests) Video
  • 62ee -Malayalam Version of “pus Bslama” in slower tempo Video
  • 62ff -Melody of “qambel MaranVideo
Video
62a Fr. Mathew Mattam. Melody of Puqdānkōn Video
62b Fr. Mathew Mattam. Melody of Tešbōhtā lalāha (Glory to God) Video
62c Fr. Mathew Mattam sings the solemn form of the Lord's prayer with Thrice Holy Video
62d Fr. Mathew Mattam. Chanting of slōthā (oration) after the Lord’s prayer Video
62e Fr. Mathew Mattam. Melody Of Psalm Video
62f Fr. Mathew Mattam. chanting of Slōthā (oration),after The Psalm Video
62g . Fr. Mathew Mattam. Melody of Lāku Mārā Resurrection Hymn; Video
62h Fr. Mathew Mattam. Chanting of Slōthā (oration), after Lāku Mārā Video
62i Fr. Mathew Mattam sings the Trisagion, Qandišā Alāhā Video
62j Slōthā (oration) after Qandišā Alāhā Video
62k Melody Of “wehu Nehde” While Kissing The Cross, During Raza Video Video
62l Melody of “barek Mār” Video
62m Style Of Chanting The Sacred Scripture Video
62n Melody of “O des damman” Video
62o Melody Of “dawrek Sāwē” During Gospel Procession Video/td>
62p Melody of “O Damhaimneen” Video
62q Melody of Announcing the Epistle Video
62r Melody of the Introductory Chant Before The Gospel Video
62s Style Of Chanting The Prayers Of The Faithful kārōthūthā .
62t Melody of “wnesek Lāk” before Anaphora Video
62u Melody of Exchange of Peace Video
62v Melody of Greeting And Dialogue. Anaphora Video
62w Melody of “kad Qāyēn” Followed By Holy Holy Holy; Video
62x Melody of Ēn Māryā Alāhā before Communion Video
62y Melody of “Māwhawsā” Video
62z Melody of “āhay Qambel” deacon’s Invitation To Communion Video
62aa Melody of “raze Dnaswan” after Communion Video Video
62bb Melody of Concluding Prayers Before the Final Blessing Video
62cc Melody of Final Blessing in Solemn Qurbana Video
62dd Melody of Wita Wangunnen (funeral service for priests) Video
62ee Malayalam Version of “pus Bslama” in slower tempo Video
62ff Melody of “qambel Maran Video
61 Presentation at the Annual Meeting of the Society for Ethnomusicology , 2016 at Omni Shoreham Hotel in Washington, D. C. 10 March 2016. Video
60 Mar George Cardinal Alencherry in conversation with Dr. Joseph J. Palackal ., CMI. Video
60a Cardinal George Alencherry entrusts Dr. Joseph J. Palackal with a new mission , CMI. Video
60b Cardinal Alencherry compliments Dr. Joseph J. Palackal Videoo
60c Cardinal George Alencherry sings the Trisagion, Qandisa Alaha Video
59a Dr. Joseph J. Palackal sings and speaks about a unique Syriac chant from the funeral services for priests in the Syro Malabar Church. This is an excerpt from his lecture on "What is Christian Musicology of India?" at Dharmaram College, Bengaluru, on 18 July 2014. Video
59b Dr. Joseph J. Palackal sings and speaks about the famous Syriac chant "Bar Maryam" This is an excerpt from his lecture on "What is Christian Musicology of India?" at Dharmaram College, Bengaluru, on 18 July 2014. Video
58 Fr. William Nellikkal's interview with Dr. Joseph J. Palackal for the Malayalam section of the Vatican Radio. full interview. Broadcast in five parts.

01. The Syriac story of the Latin chant, "Pange Lingua" by St. Thomas Aquinas (1:45)
02. Musical analysis of the melody of "Kollan Dasne" (5:20)
03. "How did you arrive at the Aramaic Project?" (10:20)
04. On the Syriac-related activities at the Palluppuram Seminary of the saintly Palackal Thoma Malpan (13:56)
05. The history of Aramaic language in India (17:24)
06. The role of Fr. Abel Periyappuram, CMI in the transition of melodies from Syriac to Malayalam" (22:27)
07. The story of the Syriac and Malayalam versions of "Beda dyawman" at Suriyanippally, Palluruthy, Kochi. (25:04)
08. The musical aspects of "Beda dyawman" (27:28)
09. The oldest Christian chant in India (30:05). Bar Maryam might have been composed in Kerala. Musical aspects of the Tamil hymn "Marayor Pawe"
10. The importance of the musical heritage of the Syro Malabar Christians (38:16)
11. Recent attempts in transferring the Syriac tradition to the younger generation (39:13)
12. Sings and speaks about the solemn form of the Lord's prayer from the Chaldean rite liturgy (47:56)
13. The negative impact of the decisions of FR. Abel and K. K. Antony Master on the liturgical music of the Syro Malabar Church (51:46)
14. On the cinematic style of the liturgical music of the syro Malabar Church (53:50)
15. About the responses from the participants at the Notre Dame University Conference to Dr. Palackal's presentation (59:13)

The earlier interviews can be found here:
First Interview Part I
First Interview Part II
Aramaic Project-45 - Second Interview
Video
58a Fr. William Nellikkal's interview of Dr. Joseph J. Palackal for the Malayalam section of the Vatican Radio. Part I of V. Broadcast on 8 & 9 January 2016.
01. The Syriac story of the Latin chant, "Pange Lingua" by St. Thomas Aquinas (1:45)
02. Musical analysis of the melody of "Kollan Dasne" (5:20)
03. "How did you arrive at the Aramaic Project?" (10:20)
Video
58b Fr. William Nellikkal's interview of Dr. Joseph J. Palackal for the Malayalam section of the Vatican Radio. Part II of V. Broadcast on 15 & 16 January 2016.

01. On the Syriac-related activities at the Palluppuram Seminary of the saintly Palackal Thoma Malpan (1:28)
02. The history of Aramaic language in India (4:45)
03. The role of Fr. Abel Periyappuram, CMI in the transition of melodies from Syriac to Malayalam" (9:51)
Video
58c Fr. William Nellikkal's interview of Dr. Joseph J. Palackal for the Malayalam section of the Vatican Radio. Part III of V. Broadcast on 22 & 23 January 2016.

01. The story of the Syriac and Malayalam versions of "Beda dyawman" at Suriyanippally, Palluruthy, Kochi. (1:50)
02. The musical aspects of "Beda dyawman" (3:38)
03. the oldest Christian chant in India (6:14). Bar Maryam might have been composed in Kerala. Musical aspects of the Tamil hymn "Marayor Pawe
Video
58d Fr. William Nellikkal's interview of Dr. Joseph J. Palackal for the Malayalam section of the Vatican Radio. Part IV of V. Broadcast on 3 March 2016. >

01. The importance of the musical heritage of the Syro Malabar Christians (2:02)
02. Recent attempts in transferring the Syriac tradition to the younger generation (2:51)
03. Sings and speaks about the solemn form of the Lord's prayer from the Chaldean rite liturgy (11:35)
04. The negative impact of the decisions of FR. Abel and K. K. Antony Master on the liturgical music of the Syro Malabar Church (15:26)
Video
58e Fr. William Nellikkal's interview of Dr. Joseph J. Palackal for the Malayalam section of the Vatican Radio. Part V of V. Broadcast on 10 March 2016.

01.On the cinematic style of the liturgical music of the syro Malabar Church (3:55)
02.About the responses from the participants at the Notre Dame University Conference to Dr. Palackal's presentation (8:51)
Video
57 Bilingual singing of Qambel Maran.

The idea of singing the same chant in its original Syriac text and its Malayalam translation came up during my interview with the Major Archbishop, George Cardinal Alencherry, the head of the Syro Malabar Church (see Aramaic Project 60 ). The Major Archbishop was very enthusiastic about the idea. On my part, this was the first attempt to put the idea into practice. The occasion was the celebration of the Office for the Dead, following the memorial mass for the first anniversary of my cousin, Fr. Thomas Palackal, and 176th anniversary of my collateral ancestor, the saintly Palackal Thoma Malpan. The congregation consisted mainly of the Palackal family who live in New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, and Canada. For that reason, I felt comfortable in doing this experiment. The adults had the Malayalam translation in front of them, while I sang the Syriac text, and therefore, did not feel disconnected from the spirit of the prayer. The youngsters, however, could not follow the meaning because they did not know Malayalam. One of them told me after the service that he liked the prayerful mood created by the melody. It remains to be seen if other priests would be willing to do such experiments, and if the laity would feel comfortable. If they do, that will lead to a positive conversation about the Syriac heritage of the Syro Malabar Church.

Video
56a Johny P. David plays “Śambah leśān” on alto saxophone.

Note: Johny P. David adds a new dimension to the Aramaic Project by articulating his favorite Syriac melodies with the rich and luscious sonority of his alto saxophone. In this video Johny plays “Śambah leśān” (Sing My Tongue), The Syriac translation of the Latin chant "Pange Lingua" by St. Thomas Aquinas (1225-1274). Liberated from the semantic and syntactic strictures of the Syriac text, the melody takes a life of its own and soars high on the wings of the dexterous fingers of Johny. This is new; Johny is a trail blazer. Syriac melodies are inextricably intertwined with liturgical texts and are seldom performed independently for enjoyment. As in the case of South Indian classical compositions, Syriac melodies are tagged by the initial words of the chant texts. By performing it outside the liturgical context, Johny gives the melody a new identity. At the same time, Johny’s decision to do the recording inside a church is commendable. The acoustic ambiance of the church adds another layer of warmth and a velvety coloring to the already smooth sound, making it all the more pleasing to the ears.

This melody has an interesting history; The Syriac translation of the Latin text might have been in existence since the sixteenth century, before the Synod of Diamper in 1599. Johny recalls that this particular melody was composed by someone in Kerala in 1953 for the celebration of the Blessing of the Blessed Sacrament on the occasion of the visit of Cardinal Eugene Tisserant (1884-1972). This visit was not an ordinary one. The Cardinal, who then was the secretary of the Congregation for the Oriental Churches, came from Rome with a special gift for the St. Thomas Christians: a relic of St. Thomas the Apostle. The relic was enshrined at a solemn ceremony at the Mar Thoma Shrine at Kodungalloor, where the Apostle is believed to have landed and established the first Christian community in South Asia. This particular melody was sung there for the first time as part of that grand celebration.

Johny plays the melody from memory, the way he learned it from Fr. Abilius, C. M. I. (1916-2000). A notated version (staff notation) was with Fr. Abilius, but was lost. In spite of its uniqueness, the melody did not become popular. As it stands, Johny’s memory base is the singular source for the melody, and we may never hear this melody it in a human voice. In any case, we are immensely grateful to Johny P. David for sharing this precious piece of music and the special memories associated with it....... Joseph J. Palackal
Video
56b Johny P. David plays “Śambah leśān” with instrumental accompaniment.

Note: Johny P. David presents the melody of Šambah lešān (Sing my Tongue) that we heard in solo performance in Part 56A, with the accompaniment of violin, guitars, and drums. Johny iterates the melody on Alto Saxophone, and Kiran C. P. and Stine Joseph reiterate it respectively on violin and keyboard. Thus, Johny allows us to experience the same melody in different tone colors. This is unconventional in many ways. Taking out of the divine context of religion and ritual efficacy, Johny brings the melody to the merely human realm of pure aesthetic enjoyment. The selection of musical instruments, too, is unconventional. Traditionally, Syro-Malabar church musicians used only violin, harmonium, triangle, and bass drum for accompaniment. Johny’s action is avant-garde. He is motivated enough to spend his time and resources to combine a tune associated with the Syriac translation of a famous Latin liturgical text with contemporary sonorities. This adds yet another layer to the multiple stories of centuries-long cultural interactions that took place in Kerala between the disparate traditions of the East and the West. By doing so, Johny presents the melody to future composers to make use of it, either by quotation, or by mutation, as Western composers did with some of the medieval chants ("Dies Ire," for example).

Viewers might argue that the serene sublimity and loving tenderness in Johny’s rendering is hampered by the selection of chords and the particular sonorities of the accompanying instruments. If Johny’s version is far superior with its delicate and subdued use of ornamentation of notes and careful control of dynamics, it is because the melody blended into his blood more than half a century ago. Johny dedicates the video to his favorite priest, Fr. Abilius, C.M.I. (1916-2000), who taught him many Syriac melodies.

Johny’s selection of the performance space, Mar Thoma National Shrine at Azhikkode, is deliberate. The story of this melody is linked to this Shrine and this place (see notes on Part-56A). History sleeps here; so does nostalgia. Christian Musicological Society of India is grateful to Johny P. David for bringing Syriac chants into a different kind of contemporary conversation....... Joseph J. Palackal
Video
56c Johny P. David plays Kollan dašne with instrumental accompaniment.

Johny P. David continues his mission of presenting his favorite Syriac melodies on Alto saxophone. In this video he plays the melody of “Kollan dašne” that used to be sung during the Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament on Sundays and special feast days in the Syro Malabar churches, until the early 1970s. The Syriac text is the translation of the Latin chant, Pange Lingua (Sing my Tongue) that St. Thomas Aquinas wrote for the feast of Corpus Christi. This particular melody is a rare one. Probably, this melody was composed by the same person who composed “Šambah lešān” that we heard in Part 56A & 56B (see notes on these entries).

Johny seems to be the only one who knows it. But for his efforts to document it, this melody would have been lost for ever. Johny voluntarily spent his time and resources to record it with instrumental accompaniment for the Aramaic Project, and preserve it for posterity.

Once again, Johny manifests his respect for the history of the St. Thomas Christians in the selection of the performance space for this video. The performance took place on the premises of the St. Thomas Syro Malabar Catholic Church at Palayur, in Kerala. Palayur is one of the seven locations where St. Thomas the Apostle is believed to have established Christin communities. The statues in the back ground show the Apostle preaching to the local Hindu priests. Music, indeed is embedded in history.

Johny P. David is an extraordinary musician, who has an excellent command over the musical instrument of his choice. With seeming effortlessness, he weaves musical phrases by lacing notes with subtle dynamics and subdued ornamentations and, thereby, evokes internal silence.....Joseph J. Palackal
Video
55 Pre-screening comments by Dr. Joseph J. Palackal on the Aramaic Project at the Conference on the Music of South, Central, and West Asia. Harvard University, 4-6 March 2016. Video
54 Fr. Jose P Kottaram in conversation with Dr. Joseph J. Palackal. Recorded at the chapel of St. John Berchman's Higher Secondary School, Changanacherry, Kerala. 1 August 2014.

NOTE:Fr. Jose Kottaram, who immersed himself in the Syriac tradition of the Syro Malabar Church from his childhood days, gives us requiem versions of melodies for three chants: “Slīwā dahwā lan,” O dez damman,” and “Qadkāyen.” He says that he learned these melodies by listening to requiem Raza that used to be celebrated frequently during those days in his parish. This are examples of singing the same text in two different ways to create different effects in the liturgy. In contrast to singing the same text with two different melodies, Fr. Kottaram also gives several examples of singing the same melody to text in Syriac and its translation in Malayalam. The transference of the melody from text in one language to another seems to take place smoothly. This was an interesting phenomena in the 1960s, during the transition of liturgies from Syriac to Malayalam. The Syriac chants were translated into Malayalam while retaining the melody of the original Syriac text. This helped the continuation of the melodies even when the original chant texts faded from the memories. See a detailed study of the transference of melody from the Syriac text to its Malayalam translation in my chapter, “The Survival Story of the Syriac Chants among the St. Thomas Christians in South India” in the Oxford Handbook of Music and World Christianities

Fr. Kottaram’s chanting of two prayers before the final blessing in solemn Qurbana shows the influence of the melody of the Latin chant Exultet. This melody, which was introduced by the Portuguese missionaries in the sixteenth century, seems to have been popular among the Syriac singers (see other examples in 25K and 25L). Fortunately, Fr. Kottaram is able to recall, albeit after about fifty years of disuse, the chanting style of the Passion narrative on Good Friday. The melodic formula seems to be the same as that of the Veneration of the Cross that we heard in Aramaic Project-Part 4 ........ Joseph J. Palackal

01. About learning Syriac during Priestly formation (0:44)
02. Melody of “Suwha lawa” (5:15)
03. Requiem melody of “Slīwā dahwā lan.” From Raza for the dead (5:50)
04. Malayalam version of the requiem tune of “Slīwā dahwā lan.” (7:38)
05. Two melodies of “Odez damman’ Before reading from the epistle (8:15)
06. Chant before the gospel proclamation (9:02)
07. “Thaibuthe d’maran iso misiha” Salutation and dialogue between the celbrant and congregation during anaphora. Syriac and Malayalam versions (9:26)
08. Melody of “Qadkayen” (14:45)
09. Style of chanting the slotha before Huthamma on Sundays (15:13)
10. Chanting of the blessing before communion: Syriac and Malayalam versions (19:30)
11. Melody of “Ualappai’ (20:00)
12. Chanting of the Institution Narrative (20:35)
13. The musical scene at St. Joseph’s Seminary at Mangalappuzha (23:48)
14. Style of chanting the Scripture readings (23:45)
15. Melody of the introduction to the proclamation of the Gospel (25:45)
16. Melody of “Rahme suqana” Rite of reconciliation (29:08)
17. Chanting of the Passion Narrative on Good Friday (30:10)
18. Pope Leo XIII and St. Berchman's Higher Secondary School (31:29)
19. About Fr. Abel Periyappuram CMI (38:18)
Video
54a Fr. Jose P. Kottaram. Melody of “Šuwha lawā.” Commemoration hymn. Video
54b Fr. Jose P. Kottaram sings the requiem melody of “Slīwâ dahwâ lan” from Raza for the dead. this chant is sung while kissing of the Cross. Category: Ōnītâ d’kanke. Video
54c Fr. Jose P. Kottaram sings the Malayalam version of the requiem tune "Slīwâ dahwâ lan" Ōnītâ d’kanke . Video Video
54d Fr. Jose P. Kottaram sings two melodies of "Odez damman" from Raza. This is sung before reading from the Eipistle. Video
54e Fr. Jose P. Kottaram sings "odem haymnīn". Before the proclamation of the Gospel in solemn Raza. Video
54f Fr. Jose P. Kottaram sings "Thaibūthe d’māran īšōmišīhâ." Blessing and the Salutation and dialogue in solemn Qurbana: Syriac and Malayalam versions. Note the smooth transition of the melody from the Syriac text to the Malayalam text. Video
54g Fr. Jose P. Kottaram sings two melodies of “Kad qāyēn” - the introduction to "Holy, Holy Holy" in solemn Qurbana in Syriac. Video
54h Fr. Jose P. Kottaram sings "Yāēmār b’kōl yāwmīn" which is the slotha (prayer) before the Huthamma (final blessing) on Sundays in Qurbana in Syriac.. Video
54i Fr. Jose P. Kottaram sings "Māwhawthâ d’thaibūthē. Blessing before communion. Syriac and Malayalam versions. Note the smooth transition of the melody from the Syriac text to the Malayalam text. Video
54j Fr. Jose P. Kottaram sings "Ual appai". Video
54k Fr. Jose P. Kottaram chants the Institution narrative in Syriac. Video
54l Fr. Jose P. Kottaram. Chanting of sacred scripture in Syriac. Video
54m Fr. Jose P. Kottaram sings the Exchange of peace and the introduction to the Gospel. Video
54n Fr. Jose P. Kottaram. Melody of “Rahme šūqānâ” (the reconciliation rite). This is one of the two melodies we have heard so far for this particular chant. Video
54o Fr. Jose P. Kottaram. Chanting of the Passion narrative on Good Friday. Video Video
53

George Thaila in conversation with Dr. Joseph J. Palackal. Recorded at Thaila's residence. 18 December 2015.

NOTE:This is a rare, yet interesting example of singing a non-liturgical Marian devotional song in Malayalam to the melody of a popular Syriac chant. George Thaila, who was born into a musical family, recalls his early childhood experience of evening family prayer at his home at Kuninji, in the Idukki District of Kerala. In the month of May, which is devoted to the Blessed Virgin Mary, the family would conclude the evening prayer with the song" Nalla Mātāwe mariye/ Nirmala yawusēppitāwe". George’s father, Augusty Thailayil (1900-1991), who was a violinist and a church musician in the Syriac tradition, would double the melody on the violin, and one of his older brothers would do the same on the harmonium. The melody got imprinted in the mind of the young George, without knowing the source of the melody. Later, he was surprised to hear the same melody in a Syriac chant at a Knanaya wedding ceremony, sometime in 1981.

The Malayalam and Syriac chants have very different syllabic structure. The opening verse of the Malayalam chant has three words and 8 syllables, whereas the opening verse of the Syriac chant has 4 syllables in two words;
Malayalam; Na-lla| Mā-tā-we| ma-ri-ye (2 +3 + 3 = 8)
Syriac: bar| |ma-ri-am (1+ 3 = 4)
In the musical realization, the melody of the first two verses of the Syriac text is negotiated to fit the 8 syllables of the first verse in the Malayalam text. A recording of Bar Maryam, sung by Rev. Dr. Jacob Vellaian can be heard on track 25, on the CD "Qambel Maran: Syriac Chants from South India" (Pan Records, Netherlands, 2002).
The interview brings out also an interesting piece of information about children’s funeral. During funeral procession from home to the church, Augusthy Thilayil used to play violin and sing the Syriac version of the song of shadrach, Meshach, and abednego from the Book of Daniel (3:53-90) It s not clear if this was a strictly local tradition, or this song was sung during similar occasions in other Syro Malabar Parishes........

Joseph J. Palackal

Video
52 Mr. Sebastian Menachery in conversation with Dr. Joseph J. Palackal. Recorded at Dharmaram Vidya Kshetram (DVK), Bangalore. 19 July 2014.

This interview is valuable, especially to musicologists and Church historians. Although not a professional musician, Sebastian Menachery reminisces, with great enthusiasm, melodies and memories from the Syro Malabar liturgy in the 1950s. Gifted with an unusual musical memory, Menachery sings even texts that only the celebrant (priest/bishop) used to sing, and chants that were heard only once a year. Menachery attributes this to the captivating power of the melodies of those chants. Whether these melodies were composed in Kerala or in the Chaldean churches in West Asia is a topic that remains to be studied. Menachery references the existence of a rich repertoire of Syriac chants that were composed locally in Kerala. He speaks also about the practice of composing and singing more than one melody for a liturgical text (see “Ual ar’a” and “M’haymnīnan”). The texts of some of these chants are Syriac translations of popular Latin chants that the Portuguese missionaries introduced or imposed on the Syro Malabar Catholics. In any event, historians of Kerala’s music can no longer ignore the contributions of Christian composers and church choirs in Kerala in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The Christian Musicological Society of India is grateful to Mr. Menachery for showcasing the relevance as well as the immense potential of the Aramaic Project..... Joseph J. Palackal

01. We have failed to hand over the Syriac heritage to the next generation (2:10)
02. In the Quran, Jesus is referred to as “Ruh Allah” (Breath of God) (5:41)
03. “I have learned Syriac and I am proud of it” (6:44)
04. The Syriac music scene at St. Joseph’s Monastery (CMI) at Koonammavu under the leadership of Fr. Justin Menachery and Lonappan Bhagavathar (6:59)
05.Melody of “U al ar’a” (And on earth) from the Syriac translation of the Latin chant, 'Gloria in Excelsis Deo' (7:50)
06: A unique melody of “Kollan Dasne” (from the Syriac translation of the Latin chant, Tantum Ergo by St. Thomas Aquinas), taught by Lonappan Bhagavathar (9:12)
07. Melody of “Barek Maar” (10:32)
08. Melody of “Puqdan Handes” from the knocking ceremony on Palm Sunday (13:08)
09. On the use of the word “Ruh” in the Hindi film lyrics. Ruh should not be translated. (14:34)
10. T. S. Eliot borrowed “Shanti Shanti Shanti” from the Upanishads to conclude “The Wasteland.” (18:08)
11. Melody of “M’haimneenan” (opening words of the Creed) (19:34)
12. Another melody of “M’haimneenan” (Creed) (20:51)
13. Melody of the Commemoration hymn. The fifth strophe/ “Swore am rawrbe” of “Suwha lawa.” (21:25)
14. Melody of the Litany Quryēlaisōn (Kyrie Eleison) in Syriac (22:14)
15. Melody of “Ślām lēk maryam” (Hail Mary). We should preserve the word “Slaamma” (22:53)
16. About the Pesaha meal (Passover meal) on Holy Thursday (24:48)
17. Melody of “Ammaanaa” (My people) from the Good Friday service in Syriac (25:47)
18. Melodies of “U al appai” and “Laaku Maaraa” from solemn Qurbana (26:27)
19. Melody of “Emare d'alaaha” (Lamb of God) from the conclusion of the Litany (28:38)
20. Melody of “Ahai qambel” (Invitation to receive communion). The melody is similar to that of “Puqdan handes” (28:56)
21. Melody of “Rahme Suqaanaa” (from the rite of reconciliation) (29:48)
22. Hymn in honor of the Sacred Heart of Jesus (30:14)
23. Another melody of Quryēlaisōn and Litany (30:33)
24. “Bhooloka paapangale” Malayalam song in honor of the Sacred Heart of Jesus (31:38)
25. Malayalam hymn, “Ethranalleso naadhaa” (32:32)
26. About Fr. Justine Menachery’s role in the publication of the Syriac Malayalam Hymnal (33:07)
27. Melody of a segment from “U al ar’a” (And on earth/from 'Gloria in Excelsis Deo') (36:31)
28. About Fr. Abel Periyappuram and his lyrics (38:22)
29. Melody of “U la tayelan,” the concluding part of the Latin chant, Te Deum (in Syriac translation). (42:34)
Video
52a Melody of "U al ar'a" (And on earth). Syriac translation of 'Gloria in Excelsis Deo'. From the solemn Qurbana in Syriac in the Syro Malabar Church before 1962. Video
52b A unique melody of "Kollan dasne." Video
52c Sebastian Menachery sings and speaks about the chant, 'Barek Maar" (Bless O Lord) from solemn celebration of Qurbana in Syriac in the Syro Malabar Church. Video
52d Sebastian Menachery sings and speaks about the chant "Puqdaan hendes" that is sung on Palm Sunday . The chant is accompanied by the ritual of knocking and opening the main door of the Church at the conclusion of the Procession. Video
52e Melody of "M’haymneenan" from the Creed In Syriac during solemn celebration of Qurbana. Probabaly composed in Kerala. Video
52f Another melody of "M’haymneenan" from the Creed which was probably composed in Kerala. Video
52g Aramaic Project-52G. Melody of the "Suwha l’awaa" the commemoration hymn in Syriac. Video
52h Quryēlaisōn - Syriac translation of the Latin litany "Kyrie eleison". Latin rituals were introduced in Kerala by the Portuguese missionaries after the Synod of Diamper (UDAYAMPERUR) In 1599. Latin chants for these rituals were translated into Syriac and were composed in Kerala. Video
52i Melody of “Ślām lēk maryam.” which is the Syriac Translation of the Latin chant, 'Salve Regina'. It is sung on Wednesdays at the monasteries of the Carmelites of Mary Immaculate in Kerala. Video
52j Melody of “Ammaanaa” (My people), the lament from Good Friday services. Video
52k Melodies of “U al appay” and “Laaku Maaraa.” Chanting of slotha (prayer) followed by the Resurrection hymn in Syriac. Melody for solemn occasions in the Syro Malabar Church. Video
52l Melody of “Emare d'alaaha” (Lamb of God), the Concluding part of the Syriac translation of the Latin Litany. Video
52m Melody of "Ahai Qambel." which is the deacon's invitation to receive the holy communion from the Solemn Qurbana. Video
52n Melody of “Rahme Suqaanaa”, from the reconciliation rite in the solemn Qurbana. Video
52o Reference to a Hymn in honor of the Sacred Heart of Jesus: "Lemba haliya Īśō māran". Video
52p Yet another melody of Quryēlaisōn (Kyrie eleison) and Litany. Video
52q Excerpt from the melody of “U al ar’a” (And on earth). Syriac Translation of 'Gloria in Excelsis Deo'. Video
52r Melody of “Ula tayelan,” from the Syriac translation of Te Deum. Video
52s Sebastian Menachery speaks about Fr. Abel Peiyappuram, CMI. Video
51

Lonappan Arackal and team in conversation with Dr. Joseph J. Palackal. Recorded at St. John Nepomucene Church, Konthuruthy, Ernakulam. 16 July 2013.

NOTE: The melodies and memories that Mr. Lonappan Arackal shares with us in this video are significant because he is a member of the transitional generation that saw the transference of the Syro Malabar liturgy from Syriac to Malayalam (July 3,1962). Lonappan has been a church musician for the last 53 years. He learned the melodies from his father and grandfather who, too, were choir leaders. Thus, we have here a musical link to a melodic tradition that is older than a century.

Lonappan sings from memory without the aid of printed books. He showed his private collection of Syriac song books that he has been safeguarding carefully. We hope to digitalize those books and make them available for researchers as soon as funds are available. Lonappan’s vivid recollection of the dramatic musical transition from the solemn to the requiem mode in the middle of Mass on Pesaha (passover/Holy/Maundy) Thursday is precious. But for this segment we wouldn’t have known such a practice existed in the Syro Malabar Liturgy.Lonappan sings four different melodies of Quryēlaisōn (Kyrie Eleison). Probably, all these melodies were composed in Kerala, after the Synod of Diamper (1599), when the Portuguese missionaries introduced many Roman-rite rituals in the Chaldean (East Syriac) liturgy of the Syro Malabar Church. Surprisingly, Lonappan sings a Syriac hymn to the Patron saint of the parish set to the meter and melody of another popular Syriac Chant, “Bar Maryam.”In this case, Bar Maryam serves as a model melody. He has also given us a second melody for the post-communion Hymn, “Māran Īśō” for solemn occasions. Overall, the contents in this video hint at several topics for further research in the history of music in Kerala…… Joseph J. Palackal


01. Melody of “Śambah leśān” from Benediction. Syriac translation of Tantum Ergo For Benediction (1:11) J. Lonappan John Arackal (vocal, harmonium), Siji Joseph (violin), A.J. Jose Arackal (triangle), Liju Chackappan ( Drum)

Full Interview