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Bishop Mar Chandy Parambil -1687

By

Bp. Gregory Karotemprel CMI

Article published in
Journal of St. Thomas Christians

Mar Chandy Parambil of Kuravilangad is the first native of Malabar to become bishop of the St. Thomas Christians. We do not have much information about his early life. Mar Chandy belonged to the Parambil family at Kuravilangad. One Kuriakose Parambil married into Kudukkassery family. The son born to the couple later became the bishop Chandy. He was born in Muttuchira. As a priest, he was the Vicar of Kuravilangad parish. Mar Chandy died in 1687 and was buried at Kuravilangad. It is believed St. Thomas ordained bishops and priests for the communities he established in India. But we do not have any historical record regarding the immediate successor of St. Thomas who ruled us. From 4th century bishops from Persian Church came and ruled us. ....... More

008-210


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The Syriac Heritage of the Syro-Malabar Church

An Essential Component of the Cultural Fabric of India

By

Dr. Joseph J. Palackal

Article published in
Journal of St. Thomas Christians

The Syriac heritage of the Syro Malabar Church is an integral part of the cultural treasures of India and the world. The Syro Malabar Church (about 4 million members) is the largest among the eight churches of the St. Thomas Christians, who were evangelized by the missionary endeavors of the Aramaic-speaking Apostle Thomas. From early on, the Aramaic (Syriac) language and music played a significant role in the experience of the Christian faith in India. In spite of the challenges from Portuguese missionaries in the sixteenth century, the Syro Malabar Christians zealously cherished and preserved the Syriac tradition. In the following centuries, they also adopted many liturgical practices from the Roman rite by translating the respective Latin texts into Syriac, and composing them anew in Kerala, thereby adding another layer to the already vast Syriac chant repertory. .................. More

008-209

 


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Journal of St. Thomas Christians

Contents

  1. The Syriac Heritage of the Syro-Malabar Church An Essential Component of the Cultural Fabric of India -Joseph J. Palackal
  2. East Syrian Marriage as Celebration of Shawtaputha or Communion - Pauly Maniyattu
  3. Bishop Mar Chandy Parambil -1687 - Bp. Gregory Karotemprel CMI
  4. Mar Ivanios and Bethany Movement - Sr. Gifty, SIC
  5. Youth Ministry Within Indian Pluralism Towards a Youth Pastoral Plan for Peace and Harmony - Soroj Mullick SDB

Editorial

The modern fickle world is constantly moving towards 'inventions of attraction'. Experts of all walks of life are experimenting to inven things and ideas that please the modern world. One can find drastic changes in science and technology, politics, education, business and management, etc., within a few decades. These changes have obviously helped the human family in various ways, especially to have a better living; however, 'the inventions of attraction' have also caused damages to societies, cultures and world at large. ............... More

1. The Syriac Heritage of the Syro-Malabar Church: An Essential Component of the Cultural Fabric of India

The Syriac heritage of the Syro Malabar Church is an integral part of the cultural treasures of India and the world. The Syro Malabar Church (about 4 million members) is the largest among the eight churches of the St. Thomas Christians, who were evangelized by the missionary endeavors of the Aramaic-speaking Apostle Thomas. From early on, the Aramaic (Syriac) language and music played a significant role in the experience of the Christian faith in India. In spite of the challenges from Portuguese missionaries in the sixteenth century, the Syro Malabar Christians zealously cherished and preserved the Syriac tradition. In the following centuries, they also adopted many liturgical practices from the Roman rite by translating the respective Latin texts into Syriac, and composing them anew in Kerala, thereby adding another layer to the already vast Syriac chant repertory. .................. More

- Joseph J. Palackal

2. East Syrian Marriage as Celebration of Shawtaputha or Communion

The celebration of marriage is of great theological significance in the East Syrian tradition. The East Syrian tradition largely makes use of the nuptial imagery in its liturgy and theology.1 There is a liturgical season, namely the season of the Dedication of the Church, which celebrates the eschatological union of Christ the bridegroom and His bride, the Church. The prayers proper to this season employ in detail many of the concepts related to the marriage. The aspect of communion is the ground on which Christ's union with the Church is compared with the marriage, and marriage is compared with the union of Christ and the Church. This paper is an attempt to examine the East Syrian Marriage as the celebration of communion. We may base our study on the different modes of celebration in Mesopotamia (in the Chaldean and Assyrian Church) and in India. ............. More

- Pauly Maniyattu

3. Bishop Mar Chandy Parambil -1687

Mar Chandy Parambil of Kuravilangad is the first native of Malabar to become bishop of the St. Thomas Christians. We do not have much information about his early life. Mar Chandy belonged to the Parambil family at Kuravilangad. One Kuriakose Parambil married into Kudukkassery family. The son born to the couple later became the bishop Chandy. He was born in Muttuchira. As a priest, he was the Vicar of Kuravilangad parish. Mar Chandy died in 1687 and was buried at Kuravilangad. It is believed St. Thomas ordained bishops and priests for the communities he established in India. But we do not have any historical record regarding the immediate successor of St. Thomas who ruled us. From 4th century bishops from Persian Church came and ruled us. ....... More

- Bp. Gregory Karotemprel CMI

4. Mar Ivanios and Bethany Movement

God, who revealed himself to human beings through various means, sent his own Son in the fullness of time and now He continues His mission through various chosen people. (Heb 1:1) He blesses mankind through them. God, when He called Abraham, said that he would be a blessing. The call of everyone, chosen by God, is to be a blessing. Archbishop Mar Ivanios was such a man chosen by God. His contribution to the ecclesial communion and reunion has paved the way for a new horizon in the Church. Mar Ivanios was instrumental in the renaissance of the Malankara Church. ........... More

- Sr. Gifty, SIC

5. Youth Ministry Within Indian Pluralism Towards a Youth Pastoral Plan for Peace and Harmony

An ideal Youth Ministry (YM) with a concrete Youth Pastoral Plan (YPP), following the proposals of the Synod on youth, 2018, noting the Indian situation, could be a legitimate contribution for the growth of all the Youth Pastoral activities in India. A dialogue of human experiences of God in context, is the intimate heart of the mission of the Church in the light of the Gospel. The foundation of YM, therefore, is based on the intercultural and interreligious dialogue (of life and faith) for universal unity through peace and harmonious living. ............... More

- Soroj Mullick SDB

  • Printed at - Deepti Printers, Bishop's House Campus, Kalawad Road,Rajkot- 360 005
008-208


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Syriac Language Studies

at

Sacred Heart College, Thevara

Copy of the Order (No. 2608/AC/ B 7/2020/MGU Dt. 16-06-2020 ) from Mahathma Gandhi University, Kottayam permitting to include "Syriac language learning" in the syllabus for an Open course starting at SH College, Thevara.

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(Video Ref. Code : CMSI-237)

Mārggam Kaḷi

മാർഗ്ഗം കളി

(Excerpts from Ongoing research)
Copyright © 2020 Joseph J. Palackal

(Excerpts from Ongoing research)
Copyright © 2020 Joseph J. Palackal

(Mārggam Kaḷi - Perfomance at Chavara Cultural Center, Kochi on 17 July 2019)
(Video Ref. Code : CMSI-237)

Mārggam Kaḷi (Malayalam, “Dance of the Way”), is a non-liturgical performing art of the St. Thomas Christians in Kerala, India. The song text celebrates the life, mission, and martyrdom of St. Thomas the Apostle in India. The proto-Dravidian-speaking converts to Christianity in Kerala chose a Pali/Sanskrit term, “Mārggam” (the way), to refer to the new religion that came to its shore from West Asia. There are two reasons for this linguistic connection. First, Kerala was a Buddhist country in the early Christian era. The region was replete with Buddhist Vihāra-s. The generic term that the Buddha used for his teaching was Mārg, meaning “way.” Therefore, the term was all too familiar to Keralites in the early Christian era. Conversion to any religion was referred to as māṛggam kūṭal (“joining the way”).

When the Christians started celebrating the faith through song and dance, they called the art form “Mārggam Kaḷi.” In canto 9, line 8, the proclamation of the Apostle is referred to as proclaiming the Mārggam, equating Mārggam with the Gospel. What is more significant is that Mārggam Kaḷi is a celebration not of the life of Jesus Christ or the content of the faith, but the mission and martyrdom of the bearer of the message of Jesus, all the way from Palestine to South India.

According to E. R. Humbye, S. J., the song and dance of Mārggam Kaḷi might be a “Christian imitation of the yāthrakaḷi, i.e., the journey song of the Nambuthiris (Malabar Brahmins),” (quoted in Mundadan 1989:30).

P. U. Lukas and the song text: The first printed version of the song text of Mārggam Kaḷi that is available today is from a compilation of P. U. Lukas in his book," Malayāḷathile Suṛiyānikṛistyānikaḷuṭe Purātanappāṭṭukaḷ" (“Ancient Songs of the Syriac Christians of Malabar,” Lukas: 1910). There is a total of 365 verses in the opening invocation, followed by 14 cantos.

 

The text that we find in P. U. Lukas is in modern Malayalam. The author followed strictly Malayalam prosody. The text went through several redactions. There are vestiges of Tamil phonemes, especially in the opening invocation, pushing the composition's date further into several centuries before the Malayalam era.

The composition of the song text happened at a time when Syriac words were part of the common parlance of Christians in Kerala. For example, throughout the song, the Apostle's name appears in its East-Syriac version: “Tōmā.” Other Syriac words that appear often are: Māran (“our Lord’). Ῑšō ( “Jesus”), slīhā (“apostle”), māmōdīsā (“baptism”) Mār (“Holy”/ “saint”), ruha (literally, “breath;” the third person of the Holy Trinity).Some times, Syriac- word endings are inflected to make them sound similar to Malayalam syntax. For example, slīhan tōmā (Canto 12, verse 18). The Syriac word slīhā (“Apostle”) does not take an “n” ending in adjectival form. Similarly, the Syriac word, māran (“our Lord”) is inflected in the vocative case as mārānē (Canto 6, verse 17). Such usages indicate strong familiarity with Syriac words as well as their use outside the context of the liturgy.

The cadences at the end of cantos deserve special attention. Departing from the meaningful text, the singers add vocables, i. e., non-sense syllables that simulate the sound of rhythmic executions on percussive instruments. Examples of such vocables are thitha thimrita thei. Intricate rhythmic footwork accompanies these vocables. The vocables do not have a specific format. The lead singer instantly creates a combination of syllables that can fit into the structure and duration of a specified number of beats in the rhythm.

Marggam Kali and the Knanaya Christians: All the masters of Mārggam Kaḷi that we know of are from the Knanaya Christians community, an endogamous group among the St. Thomas Christians. By the twentieth century, the performers of this art form came from the Knanaya community. Therefore, the Knanaya community deserves credit for preserving and continuing a performing art tradition, which might have been a common patrimony of the St. Thomas Christians in Kerala.

Men or women?

P. U. Lukas listed the songs of Mārggam Kaḷi under the category of āṇpāṭṭukaḷ (Men’s songs) (Lukas [1910] 2002: 116-155). Until the middle of the twentieth century, only men performed Mārggam Kaḷi. Fr. Jacob Vellian persuaded the Kerala State Minster for Education to include Mārggam Kaḷi as an item in inter-school youth festivals. This led to a resurgence of the art form among the Catholic youth. In a recorded conversation in 2018, Fr. Vellian said that his goal was to keep the art form alive because it was on the decline. In any case, the introduction of Mārggam Kaḷi in inter-school youth festivals became a watershed in the history of this art form.The dance vocabulary changed in order to accommodate the female body.

All in all, Marggam Kali is a symbol of the cultural synthesis of Christianity in India.

Joseph J. Palackal, CMI
New York
25 June 2020
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Guide

to

Syriac Transliteration

By

Dr. Joseph J. Palackal

Guide to Syriac Transliteration

Prepared by

Dr. Joseph J. Palackal
30 May 2020

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Qandiśā Alāhā (Trisagion) Music score by S. Sebastian Ottaplackal

MP3 Instrumental Music Cover Track and Music Notation Booklets for the Music score of Qandiśā Alāhā (Trisagion).

(Conductor's Score)

(Voice / Chords )

(Ist Violin / Voice)

(IInd Violin / Voice)

(Cello / Voice)

 

(Download MP3 Instrumental Music Cover Track)

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(Video - Part I)

(Video - Part II)

Importance of Syriac Language
സുറിയാനി ഭാഷയുടെ പ്രാധാന്യം

Mar Joseph Kallarangattu speaks about the importance of Syriac Language.

 

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Text version 1


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Text version 2


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Wedding Ritual in the Assyrian Church of the East

വിവാഹ ശുശ്രുഷ

 

008-202

 


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Eezhathuruthile Mar Sleeva - Oru Yatra
ഈഴത്തുരുത്തിലെ മാർ സ്ലീവാ - ഒരു യാത്ര


By

Johnson P. Varghese

008-201

 


(Pdf Download)

Pesaha Prayer and Appam Preparation
പെസഹാ ഭക്ഷണം തയ്യാറാക്കലം ഇണ്ടറിയപ്പം മുറിക്കൽ ശുശ്രുഷയം

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